Posted in Summer Blog Tour

Don’t Domesticate Your Faith

 

Faith Unshackled 01

Over the next couple of months God thru the Arts will be hosting a series of posts by guest bloggers as I again participate in our annual Summer Blog Tour. I hope you follow along, check out each author’s personal blog, and find ways to unshackle your faith. 

I will also be looking for ways to pair great works of art with their inspiring words.  Last weekend spent some time in D.C and it reminded me of the paintings of Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902)  He has so many beautiful images of mountainscapes and I learned that this one hangs in the White House. I hope you will enjoy these pairings of his work with Peter Horne’s wonderful blog on having a faith that will move mountains and encourages us to get out into the world and our community that surrounds us. May God’s peace be with you:)

1280px-Albert_Bierstadt_-_Rocky_Mountain_Landscape_-_Google_Art_Project
Rocky Mountain Landscape, 1870, oil on canvas, Albert Bierstadt, This painting hangs in the  Red Room of the White House

I met Peter Horne 3 years ago when we were both attending Summer Celebration at Lipscomb University in Nashville. A real gentleman and a scholar, Peter demonstrated the heart of Christ by inviting me to share a meal with his group. I experienced an easy flow of conversation that I can still find resonating here in his writing. To find more blogs by Peter go to:

www.aussiepete.wordpress.com.

www.culturalmosaic.org.

 

Don’t Domesticate Your Faith by Peter Horne

In 2017 my church has adopted the theme Faith Unshackled. Intentionally ambiguous, this theme could be interpreted and applied in different ways. Inherent to the concept is the possibility that our faith may be shackled, restricted or limited.

Before I can decide if my faith languishes below God’s intention for me, I must understand the possibilities.

The word faith simply means to trust someone else. When that someone else is God, then the things we trust him with can be big things. But sometimes the things God wants us to trust him with are bigger than we’re ready to risk.

Jesus understood the dynamic nature of our faith in God. Our faith grows over time. As we establish a track record with God, our capacity to trust him with bigger areas and issues in our lives grows. Because faith does not grow along a straight line, the fragility of our faith means that some days we gladly trust God with everything, and then at other days we wonder if we can trust him with anything.

I know Jesus understands this phenomena because he witnessed it in his closest disciples.

In Matthew 17 a group of disciples attempted to cast out a demon… and failed. They approach Jesus seeking insight into why their efforts failed. Jesus responds with a well-known statement that I’m not sure encourages his disciples that they only need a little faith, or scolds them for not having even the smallest amount of faith.

Truly I tell you, if you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move. Nothing will be impossible for you.   Matthew 17:20

HRSOA_AlbertBierstadt-Storm_in_the_Mountains
Storm in the Mountains, 1870, oil on canvas, Albert Bierstadt, Image Source

In the chapter prior, Jesus had given his disciples a big, enormous, radical faith challenge:

Then Jesus said to his disciples, “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me will find it.” Matthew 16:24-25

Both of these challenges from Jesus describe faith leading to radical outcomes. Yet so often we limit our faith to praying that Sister Jones’ kidney stone will pass quickly. In this process we reduce faith that was intended to be bold, radical and world-changing, and we domesticate it. We reduce faith to something manageable. Rather than inspiring courage, innovation and adventures for God, we transform it into a safety net in case of emergencies and kidney stones. Of course God cares about kidney stones and the suffering of his children, but the possibilities of faith extend much further.

In the Great Commission of Matthew 28:18-20 Jesus sends his disciples to the ends of the earth. He reminds them of his supreme power and promises his presence wherever they go. Then he watches to see their faith in action.

Today, I write about this moment that took place 2000 years ago on the shores of Galilee, from a time and country never imagined all those years ago. My existence and love for Christ demonstrate the power of those disciples’ faith.

As my church explores what it means for us to live with Unshackled Faith, I have encouraged us not to leave our faith chained to the pew. We must demonstrate our faith in God to those around us.

This may mean involving oneself in church ministries such as our community garden, or apartment cookouts. Unshackled Faith could also mean hosting a cookout and inviting church members we’ve never eaten with before, just because we’re committed to following Christ together. Or maybe we’re finding ways to bring unchurched and churched friends together in non-threatening social settings. Perhaps the Holy Spirit is prompting us to launch a new ministry or add our energy to an existing one.

We all have our comfort zones. The thing is, comfort zones don’t require faith.

Albert_Bierstadt_-_Among_the_Sierra_Nevada,_California_-_Google_Art_Project
Among the Sierra Nevada, California, 1868 oil on canvas, Albert Bierstadt 1830-1902, Smithsonain American Art Museum 

Peter Horne - pic 01

Peter Horne moved to the United States from Australia in 1999 to pursue training for ministry. Having filled the roles of children’s minister, youth minister, and college minister in various locations around the US and Australia, he now gladly serves as the minister for the Lawson Rd Church of Christ in Rochester, NY. You can find more of his writing on his blog: www.aussiepete.wordpress.com. He also writes to equip multi-ethnic churches at www.culturalmosaic.org.

 

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Author:

I am a Christian Author, Arts Teacher, Public Speaker and Musician. My mission is to share the power of arts to the greater Christian community. My books, "My Dancing Day: Reflections of the Incarnation in Art and Music" and "The Joyful Sound, Reflections on the Life of Christ in Art and Music" can be found on Amazon or in My Createspace estore: https://www.createspace.com/4318541

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