Native American Pottery

For those of you who know me, I don’t always know the reason I am drawn to something. However, I think it is important to listen to your heart and let yourself notice the things that are calling to you at in point in time.

This week, I was reminded that I spent all one summer totally fascinated with Native American crafts such as this pottery. I know it was an important part of my journey. To see the great variety of colors and shapes of the pottery. And then to notice all the details of the geometric and animal symbolic designs.

These are just a few of the examples from the Pueblos of Northern  New Mexico. Sixteenth century Spanish explorers named them “Pueblo” for town dwellers.

Their craft can be traced back over 1500 years. This art continues to change and innovate today making it the most long-lived craft of the North American Indians.

  • There are some 16 different Pueblos, each having their own unique pottery style. Their symbols include:
    •  Bear Paw used in a time of drought to direct them to water. A symbol of thankfulness.
    • Water Way represent rivers lakes streams and bodies of water.
    • Cloud Design signifies rain, because of the drought
    • Kiva Design The four steps in the design represent the four stages in life, Birth, Life, Death, and Afterlife. Also the 4 seasons and the 4 directions. 
    • Feather Design are sacred and used in many tribal feast days and celebrations. 
    • Lightening Design is another rain symbol.
    • Water Serpent the water gives life to all, so this design represents their interpretation of the spirit of the water. 
    • Melon Design represents when their people went from hunting to farming.

I hope you will join me this week to celebrate this great works of Art.

Peace!

J. R.

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